By Jim Timm JimTimm

May 2016

The following are the NTSB reports of the aviation accidents that have occurred in Arizona from late April thru late May, 2016. We will use this detailed accident information in the coming year to develop safety programs and briefings that we hope will help pilots learn from the mistakes being made by others, and then take the action necessary to prevent similar accidents from happening to them. Unfortunately, pilots have not gotten off to a good year in avoiding bad accidents. We really do need to get back to flying more carefully and safely in 2016.

From a flight safety standpoint, this reporting period was not good in that we had a number of accidents with two of them being fatal. In all, there were six accidents that occurred in late April through May that have had reports filed this reporting period. Unfortunately, some of them did not include accident details at this time, but it would be safe to assume they were not serious from a personal injury standpoint.

Based on information available when this summary was prepared, the accidents are as follows:

THESE THREE ACCIDENTS OCCURRED IN A PREVIOUS REPORTING PERIOD, BUT THE REPORTS WERE MADE AVAILABLE DURING THIS REPORTING PERIOD.

Accident Date: Sunday, March 13, 2016

Report Dated 5/3/16

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Chandler

Aircraft Type: Cessna 140

Injuries: 1 Uninjured

LOSS OF CONTROL LANDING

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that he encountered a crosswind during a wheel landing. During the landing roll, the pilot further reported that the airplane "drifted abruptly to the left" and he added right rudder, but the airplane departed the runway to the left. During the runway excursion, the airplane ground looped to the left and collided with an airport sign, the right main landing gear separated, and the right wing impacted the ground. A post-accident examination revealed substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows: The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion, a ground loop, and a collision with an airport sign.

Accident Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Report Dated: 5/11/16

Title 14 CFR Part 133 (Rotorcraft External Load Operations)

Location: Supai

Aircraft Type: BELL 206

Injuries: 1 Minor

UNCONTROLLED LANDING

The pilot reported that he was performing external load long line hauling operations with a helicopter and was on a return leg with two empty nets. During the approach to a hilltop helipad, the pilot reported that he performed a normal approach, rather than a long line approach. Subsequently, the 100 foot long line snagged on a ridgeline and the helicopter jerked in an uncontrollable turn to the right, touched down right skid first, and rolled over. The pilot reported that he forgot that the long line was still attached. The tail boom was substantially damaged.

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The operator submitted two operator/ owner safety recommendations to the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge. First, the operator revised the normal operation checklist. The revised checklist included a new "CARGO HOOK – CHECK" in both the BEFORE TAKEOFF and DESCENT AND LANDING checklist. Second, the chief pilot provided a copy of a memorandum to all employees that directs the use of an observer, when available, to observe the takeoff and landings and communicate any unsafe condition to the pilot via radio communication or hand signals.

Accident Date: Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Payson

Aircraft Type: Cessna 172

NO NTSB INFORMATION AVAILABLE

THE FOLLOWING ACCIDENTS OCCURRED DURING THE CURRENT REPORTING PERIOD. DETAILED NTSB ACCIDENT REPORTS HAVE NOT YET BEEN PUBLISHED FOR ALL.

Accident Date: Sunday, April 24, 2016

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Tucson

Aircraft Type: Grob G103 Twin Astir

NO NTSB INFORMATION AVAILABLE

Accident Date: Monday May 2, 2016

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Mesa

Aircraft Type: Cessna 172S

NO NTSB INFORMATION AVAILABLE

Accident Date: Saturday May 7, 2016

Report Dated: 5/11/16

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Surprise

Aircraft Type: Beech G35 Bonanza

Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious

INFLIGHT LOSS OF POWER

On May 07, 2016, about 1655 MST, a Beechcraft G35 Bonanza sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a reported loss of engine power near Surprise. The flight instructor was fatally injured and the private pilot sustained serious injuries. The flight was being operated as a maintenance check/instructional flight when the accident occurred. The flight departed Glendale Municipal Airport (GEU) about 1630. The flight instructor, who also held a mechanic's certificate, was asked to complete a maintenance flight after the airplane had recently been serviced. He elected to use the accident flight to also provide instruction to the private pilot who requested a checkout in the airplane.

A witness who observed the airplane descending over a parking lot stated that the airplane appeared "low, slow, and quiet." The airplane then disappeared behind a building, and subsequently impacted a green belt in a residential area. Multiple residents close to the accident site heard the sound of impact and alerted first responders.

Review of preliminary radar data indicated that the airplane made one circuit in the airport traffic pattern before departing the airport to the northeast. About 10 miles north of GEU, the airplane made a 180 degree right turn followed by a 270 degree left turn, and subsequently entered a constant descent which continued to the last radar return, located about 15 miles southeast from the accident site.

The initial impact point (IIP) was identified by several broken tree branches on a eucalyptus tree, about 30 feet above ground level. The airplane continued intact from the IIP along a 242 degree magnetic heading for about 100 feet before impacting a large pine tree. The wings and empennage then separated from the fuselage, which came to rest inverted about 30 feet from the pine tree. All the major components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. A detailed examination of the engine and airframe are pending.

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration flight plan had been filed.

accident summary 2016

Accident Date: Wednesday May 11, 2016

Report Dated: 5/19/16

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Winslow

Aircraft Type: Boeing B75N1

Injuries: 2 Uninjured

LOSS OF POWER ON TAKEOFF

On May 11, 2016, about 1710 MST a Boeing B75N1 was substantially damaged during a forced landing at the Winslow-Lindbergh Regional Airport (INW). The private pilot and her passenger were not injured. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident with an intended destination of Phoenix.

The pilot reported that during takeoff from runway 29, as the airplane ascended to about 30 to 50 feet above the ground, the engine began to lose RPM. The pilot initiated a left turn to avoid power lines and subsequently landed off airport. During the landing roll, the right main landing gear sunk into the ground and the airplane cartwheeled. The pilot reported that all four wings, tail, and fuselage were structurally damaged.

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight.

Accident Date: Thursday May 12, 2016

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Wickenburg

Aircraft Type: Piper PA28

NO NTSB INFORMATION AVAILABLE

Accident Date: Tuesday May 17, 2016

Report Dated: 5/23/16

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Mesa, Falcon Field

Aircraft Type: North American AT6

Injuries: 2 Fatal

LOSS OF POWER ON TAKEOFF

On May 17, 2016, about 1842 MST a North American AT-6, N3198G, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Falcon Field Airport (FFZ), Mesa. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Wings of Flight Foundation, and the local flight originated from FFZ at 1841 mountain standard time. Multiple witnesses reported that shortly after takeoff they heard "popping" sounds accompanied with a loud "bang" and it appeared that the engine was not producing enough power. As the airplane exited the airport boundary, above an airport perimeter road, it made an 180-degree turn. Immediately thereafter, the airplane impacted the ground and a post impact fire ensued.

Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan had been filed.

I hope a low accident and serious injury rate can continue for 2016, and I also hope we have met our quota for fatal accidents for 2016. Please fly carefully out there! Based on information available when this summary was prepared, the three accidents in this period are as follows:

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