Managing Unexpected Events

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General Aviation Joint Steering Committee

Outreach Guidance Document

2015/03/06-018 (E) PP

This outreach guidance is provided to all FAA and aviation industry groups that are participating in outreach efforts sponsored by the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC). It is important that all outreach on a given topic is coordinated and is free of conflicts. Therefore, all outreach products should be in alignment with the outline and concepts listed below for this topic.

Outreach Month: July 2015

Topic: Managing Unexpected Events

The FAA and industry will conduct a public education campaign emphasizing the best practices regarding single-pilot CRM operational techniques. One aspect of CRM addresses management of unexpected events. Humans are subject to a “startle response” when they are faced with unexpected emergency situations and may delay action or initiate inappropriate action in response to the emergency. Training and preparation can reduce startle response time and promote more effective and timely response to emergencies.

Background

Fatal general aviation accidents often result from inappropriate responses to unexpected events. Loss of aircraft control is a common factor in accidents that would have been survivable if control had been maintained throughout the emergency. In some cases pilot skill and knowledge have not been sufficient developed to prepare for the emergency but in others it would seem that an initial inappropriate reaction began a chain of events that led to disaster. Humans are subject to a “startle response” when they are faced with unexpected emergency situations and may delay action or initiate inappropriate action in response to the emergency. Training and preparation can help pilots to manage the startle response and effectively cope with unexpected events.

Teaching Points:

· Unexpected events – especially those occurring close to the ground – require rapid appropriate action.

· Startle response can delay action or precipitate inappropriate action.

· Encourage pilots and CFIs to train and plan for emergencies.

o Review and practice “what if” scenarios.

o Vocalize takeoff, approach, and landing expectations.

§ Aircraft configuration, airspeed, altitude and route

§ Emergency options

References:

Managing Unexpected Events Power Point

Available on the National FAASTeam Share Point site under Approved Presentations.

Aviation Risk Management Handbook (FAA-H-8083-2) – Chapter Five

General Aviation Joint Steering Committee

Outreach Guidance Document

2015/03/06-018 (E) PP

This outreach guidance is provided to all FAA and aviation industry groups that are participating in outreach efforts sponsored by the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC). It is important that all outreach on a given topic is coordinated and is free of conflicts. Therefore, all outreach products should be in alignment with the outline and concepts listed below for this topic.

Outreach Month: July 2015

Topic: Managing Unexpected Events

The FAA and industry will conduct a public education campaign emphasizing the best practices regarding single-pilot CRM operational techniques. One aspect of CRM addresses management of unexpected events. Humans are subject to a “startle response” when they are faced with unexpected emergency situations and may delay action or initiate inappropriate action in response to the emergency. Training and preparation can reduce startle response time and promote more effective and timely response to emergencies.

Background:

Fatal general aviation accidents often result from inappropriate responses to unexpected events. Loss of aircraft control is a common factor in accidents that would have been survivable if control had been maintained throughout the emergency. In some cases pilot skill and knowledge have not been sufficient developed to prepare for the emergency but in others it would seem that an initial inappropriate reaction began a chain of events that led to disaster. Humans are subject to a “startle response” when they are faced with unexpected emergency situations and may delay action or initiate inappropriate action in response to the emergency. Training and preparation can help pilots to manage the startle response and effectively cope with unexpected events.

Teaching Points:

· Unexpected events – especially those occurring close to the ground – require rapid appropriate action.

· Startle response can delay action or precipitate inappropriate action.

· Encourage pilots and CFIs to train and plan for emergencies.

o Review and practice “what if” scenarios.

o Vocalize takeoff, approach, and landing expectations.

§ Aircraft configuration, airspeed, altitude and route

§ Emergency options

References:

Managing Unexpected Events Power Point

Available on the National FAASTeam Share Point site under Approved Presentations.

Aviation Risk Management Handbook (FAA-H-8083-2) – Chapter Five

http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/risk_management_handbook/

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