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The following are the NTSB reports of the aviation accidents that have occurred in Arizona from late February through late March. The APA will use this detailed accident information to develop safety programs, briefings, and posters/flyers that would help pilots learn from the mistakes being made by others and take the action necessary to prevent them from having similar accidents.

It’s a bit un-nerving that the NTSB has not reported any accidents occurring since February 8. Past experience tells me that, for some reason, the NTSB is not reporting some of the accidents like they have in the past. We are going to have to make some inquiries into what has changed in the reporting system. While it’s also true that I haven’t heard the usual side comments of accidents happening, I find it hard to believe things are going along this well. Flying activity has not been slowing down from what I have been experiencing. I would really like to think that perhaps everyone is really being more careful in what they are doing.

A factual report was issued in this reporting period on an accident that had occurred in early February, and there were also three factual reports issued on accidents that had occurred late last year that just had their reports issued that are also covered in this report. 

THE FOLLOWING ACCIDENT OCCURRED EARLIER THIS YEAR AND THE FINDINGS REPORT WAS RELEASED IN THIS PAST REPORTING PERIOD

Accident Date: February 8, 2019

Factual Report Dated: 3/19

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Page

Aircraft Type: Kitfox IV Speedster

Injuries: 2 Uninjured

LOSS OF CONTROL LANDING

The pilot reported that, while en route, he observed that his passenger was becoming ill and he reached for the "sick bags," but he was unable to reach them due to his seat belt. He decided to make a precautionary landing on a dirt road. During the landing flare, a wind gust "pushed the right wing up," the airplane drifted left, and the left wing struck a tree. The airplane rotated counterclockwise and impacted the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and wing.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that the wind was from an unknown direction at 8 to 14 knots, gusting to 14 to 16 knots. The automated weather observation station located about 12 miles from the accident site reported that, about 7 minutes before the accident, the wind was variable at 3 knots. The pilot was landing to the south.

 

 

THE FOLLOWING ACCIDENTS HAD OCCURRED LATE IN LAST YEAR’S REPORTING PERIOD. THE FACTUAL REPORTS WERE RELEASED IN THIS REPORTING PERIOD

 

Accident Date: October 27, 2018

Factual Report Dated: 2/27/19

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Marana

Aircraft Type: Diamond DA40

Injuries: 1 Uninjured

LOSS OF CONTROL LANDING

The solo student pilot reported that, while en route to the non-towered airport, she obtained local weather and reported on the common traffic advisory frequency that she would be entering the downwind for runway 30. Another pilot in the traffic pattern reported that they were using runway 12, so the student performed a 180° turn to enter the downwind for runway 12. She added that during the landing roll, she applied brakes and attempted to turn right off the runway, but her "speed was still high." She realized she would not be able to make the turn, so she attempted to turn left back onto the runway. The airplane skidded off the runway to the right and impacted a taxiway sign. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The deputy safety officer of the flight school reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 350° at 4 knots. The student pilot landed the airplane on runway 12.

 

 

Accident Date: November 14, 2018

Factual Report Dated: 3/14/19

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Williams

Aircraft Type: Beech A36

Injuries: 1 Minor Injury, 1 Uninjured

COLLISION WITH TERRAIN ON TAKEOFF

The pilot reported that, during an uphill takeoff into ascending terrain, about 4,000 ft down the 6,000 ft runway and at 80 knots, he rotated the airplane and stayed in ground effect to gain airspeed. He began pulling back to establish a climb, but the stall warning horn chirped, so he reduced the pitch attitude. He "constantly attempted" to pitch up until he heard the stall horn. At the end of the runway, he retracted the landing gear, but it did not affect performance. He reported that he knew the airplane had attained a positive climb rate but did not know the specific value. He then saw that the airplane was going to strike a tree, so he pulled back hard, but the airplane struck the tree and then impacted terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 9 minutes after the accident, the wind was calm, temperature 10°C (50°F), dew point -6°C (3°F), and altimeter 30.41" Hg. The airplane departed on runway 18.

The airport elevation was about 6,691 ft mean sea level (MSL). Runway 18 was 6,000 ft by 100 ft with a 1.0% up gradient. The calculated density altitude was 7,128 ft. The calculated takeoff distance with flaps up was 2,442 ft and the takeoff distance over a 50 ft obstacle was 4,440 ft. The calculated rate of climb was 670 ft/min.

The airplane was equipped with additional tip tanks per a supplemental type certificate, which increased the maximum gross weight to 3,833 pounds. The pilot reported that the weight at the time of the accident was 3,797 pounds with a center of gravity of 80.7" near the forward center of gravity limit.

The pilot added that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector estimated that the tree was 35 to 40 ft tall. The FAA inspector provided an on-scene picture which included an elevation and latitude/longitude coordinates for the accident site. The elevation was 6,716 ft MSL and, based on the coordinates, about 0.4 miles from the end of the runway.

 

 

Accident Date: November 23, 2018

Factual Report Dated: 3/11/2019

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Benson

Aircraft Type: Bellanca Champion 7GCBC

Injuries: 2 Uninjured

LOSS OF CONTROL LANDING

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing, the right wing lifted, and the airplane drifted left. He added that he over corrected and the airplane veered to the right off the runway. The left main landing gear caught in the dirt, collapsed, and the left wing impacted the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that, at the accident airport, about 15 minutes before the accident, the wind was reported as variable, calm, and not gusting.

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