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The following are the NTSB reports of aviation accidents that occurred in Arizona from late October through late November. APA will use this detailed accident information to develop safety programs, briefings, and posters/flyers that would help pilots learn from the mistakes being made by others, and take the action necessary to prevent them from having similar accidents.

Aviation safety in this past reporting period was not too bad in that there were only four accidents reported, and none of them involved fatalities. This report also includes three reports of accidents that occurred at an earlier date, but the detailed accident reports were released in this reporting period. 

It’s unfortunate that two of the accidents the past period didn’t have detailed reports released, only the accident notification. The following are the details of what is presently available.

 

ACCIDENTS IN THIS REPORTING PERIOD

 

Accident Date: October 6, 2019

Preliminary Report Dated: November 13, 2019

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Marana

Aircraft Type: Glaser-Dirks DG500 (Experimental Glider)

Injuries: 1 Uninjured, 1 Minor

INFLIGHT LOSS OF CONTROL

On October 6, 2019, about 1300 Mountain Standard Time, an experimental Glaser-Dirks DG- 500 Trainer collided with mountainous terrain near Marana. The commercial pilot sustained minor injuries and the pilot undergoing instruction (PUI) was not injured; the glider empennage was substantially damaged. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at El Tiro Glider port, near Tucson about 1230.

The commercial pilot stated that he planned to evaluate the PUI performance of maneuvers that were part of the Sportsman Glider aerobatic competition sequence. The PUI began the maneuvers three miles north of the El Tiro Glider port at 7,000 feet above ground level (AGL). After completing the Reverse Half Cuban, Lay Down Humpty, Loop, 90 Degree Tum and 1⁄4 clover, the next maneuver was planned to be the Sharks Tooth. At an altitude of approximately 5,000 feet AGL, with the glider configured in a pitch-up attitude of 30°, the PUI rolled the glider inverted. The nose dropped to approximately 20° above the horizon but the commercial pilot elected to continue the maneuver. The glider slowed and stalled in the inverted position.

The PUI did not make an aggressive recovery and the commercial pilot pulled the control stick aft to establish a 4g recovery. The glider's airspeed increased from around 90 kts to the never- exceed speed (VNE) almost instantaneously. The airspeed increased past 155 kts and the glider experienced a high frequency elevator flutter with the nose still below the horizon. During the recovery, the right spoiler deployed and the pilots felt the elevator was not controllable. They opted to make an emergency landing to the runway with minimal directional control. During landing, the glider's descent was more than they had anticipated, and it touched down on a bush damaging the empennage.

 

 

Accident Date: October 14, 2019

Preliminary Report Dated: November 11, 2019

Location: Buckeye

Aircraft Type: AEROPRO CZ A220 (Light Sport Airplane)

Injuries: UNK

The NTSB has not yet made the preliminary report available.

 

 

Accident Date: October 19, 2019

Preliminary Report Dated: November 7, 2019

Location: Safford

Aircraft Type: Zenith CH701

Injuries: UNK

The NTSB has not yet made the preliminary report available.

 

 

Accident Date: October 24, 2019

Preliminary Report Dated: 11/19/19

Title 14 CFR Part 91 Operation

Location: Red Creek

Aircraft Type: Cessna 205A

Injuries: 3 Uninjured

CONTROLLED FLIGHT INTO TERRAIN

On October 24, 2019, about 1600 Mountain Standard Time, a Cessna 205A collided with terrain during takeoff following an aborted landing at Red Creek Airstrip, near Payson, Arizona. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the tail and both wings after nosing over. The flight departed Payson Airport (PAN), Payson, Arizona, about 1545. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The flight originally departed from Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (BJC), Denver, Colorado earlier in the morning. The pilot serviced the airplane with the addition of 40 gallons of fuel at PAN, with the intention of then flying to Red Creek and camping overnight at the airstrip.

Red Creek is an unimproved airstrip located within the Tonto National Forest at an elevation of about 2,300 ft. It is composed of a single dirt runway (designation 6/24) that is about 1,200 ft long and 15 ft wide. The airstrip is surrounded by rising terrain, which according to the Arizona Pilots Association and the Recreational Aviation Foundation, necessitates landing on runway 24, and departing from runway 6.

The pilot reported that the flight to Red Creek lasted about 10 minutes, and upon arrival he overflew the airstrip and observed the windsock, which indicated a direct right crosswind for runway 24, with wind speeds that he estimated to be between 4 and 9 knots. He initiated a landing approach from the northeast to runway 24, and decided to perform a go-around after judging that the airplane was too high. He reported that the second approach was stabilized, and after touching down he applied the brakes; however, the airplane became airborne again. He applied full throttle, and continued to fly the airplane in ground effect until reaching the end of the runway. He then pulled back on the control yoke to initiate a climb, but the airplane was unable to climb out over the rising terrain and struck vegetation about 500 ft beyond the runway threshold.

 

 

THE FOLLOWING REPORTS WERE ALSO RELEASED IN THE PAST REPORTING PERIOD

 

Accident Date: July 16, 2019

Factual Report Dated: September 5, 2019

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Grand Canyon

Aircraft Type: Cessna 172

Injuries: 4 Uninjured

LOSS OF CONTROL IN FLIGHT

The pilot reported that, during approach to land, he corrected for a left crosswind. After crossing the threshold, he reduced power and as he was about to touch down, the airplane "rolled" to the left and the left wing struck the runway. The airplane immediately "righted itself" and he landed the airplane. He added that the runway strike caused a "minor misalignment" with the airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no pre accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport's automated weather observation station reported that, about 36 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 210° at 11 knots, gusting to 19 knots. The same automated station reported that, about 24 minutes after the accident, the wind was from 210° at 17 knots, gusting to 25 knots, with a peak wind reported 3 minutes after the accident from 220° at 27 knots. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 21.

 

 

Accident Date: August 4, 2019

Preliminary Report Dated: October 17, 2019

Title 14 CFR Part 91

Location: Paulden

Aircraft Type: Schleicher ASW 24 (Glider)

Injuries: 1 Serious

LOSS OF CONTROL ON GROUND

The glider pilot reported that, due to the unimproved airport blending in with the surrounding environment, he was unable to identify the runway and decided to land on a dirt road. While concentrating on landing, he failed to extend the landing gear. On short finial, he noticed that the landing gear was not extended and while changing hands to extend the landing gear, the glider drifted right of the dirt road. Upon landing on the dirt road, the glider veered right and impacted a utility box.

The glider sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and canopy.

 

 

Accident Date: September 20, 2019

Factual Report Dated: 11/20/19

Title 14 CFR Part 91 Operation

Location: Sedona

Aircraft Type: Piper PA60

Injuries: 4 Uninjured

INFLIGHT LOSS OF CONTROL DURING LANDING APPROACH

The pilot of the retractable-landing gear, multi-engine airplane reported that, while on approach to land, he felt the airplane was a little slow and below glide path. He corrected by adding power, reestablishing on the visual approach slope indicator (VASI) glide path and continued the landing. However, when the airplane reached the approach end of the runway, the airplane aerodynamically stalled. He lowered the nose and the airplane landed about 15 ft before the threshold of the runway. The airplane bounced onto the runway, veered right, exited the runway onto the adjacent field, and the landing gear collapsed. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no pre accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport's automated weather observation station reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 180° at 15 knots and gusting to 24 knots. The pilot reported that the wind was from 210 at 15 to 25 knots, gusting 15 to 25 knots. The pilot was landing the airplane on runway 21.

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